AIANTA to Develop Travel Guide, Indigenous Place Names Map Chronicling Tribal Stories Along the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail

In an agreement with the National Park Service, AIANTA is developing a travel guide and Indigenous place names map of the tribes located along the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (April 22, 2021) – The American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association (AIANTA) has entered the second phase in a tiered partnership program with the National Park Service, in which AIANTA is chronicling the stories of tribes, tribal destinations and Native-owned hospitality businesses located along the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail, which stretches from Nogales, Arizona to the San Francisco Bay Area.

Starting April 24, 2021, AIANTA travel writer Steve Larese will begin conducting in-person interviews and site visits to collect stories from tribal historians, culture bearers and other tourism professionals representing tribes, destinations and Native-owned businesses located along the Trail.

“We are thrilled to work with the National Park Service in developing this rarely-seen look at the Anza Trail, which follows some of the most popular roadways in Arizona and California,” said Sherry L. Rupert, AIANTA CEO. “Ultimately, AIANTA’s original research will result in a one-of-a-kind guidebook and place names map which will shine a light on tribal tourism destinations along the route.”

The project, a result of a multi-year agreement between AIANTA, the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail and the National Park Service, which was first announced in November 2018, has already delivered a robust series of educational webinars.

The project will culminate in a county-by-county guidebook for travelers, with each chapter exploring the top tribal destinations and Native-owned businesses along the way. Each chapter will feature in-person interviews with regional culture bearers and tribal leaders. The guidebook will be accompanied by a series of original, hand-drawn maps by celebrated cartographer Dr. Margaret Pearce (Citizen Potawatomi Nation.)  The maps will detail the original, indigenous place names of sites along the Trail.

“There are so many ways to explore the Anza Trail which is intrinsically tied to the cultural heritage of the Southwestern United States,” said Naomi Torres, Superintendent of the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail. “The National Park Service is delighted to be working with AIANTA to help share the stories of the tribal nations located along the trail.”

The Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail follows a 1,200-mile path undertaken by Lt. Colonel Juan Bautista de Anza who led more than 240 settlers from Mexico to the San Francisco Bay Area. The journey started in October 1775, just as American colonists in the East were entering their sixth month of armed conflict against the Kingdom of Great Britain. Today the Trail can largely be navigated by automobile with Historic Landmark signs showcasing key destinations along the way.

For more information about the project, visit www.aianta.org/anza-trail.

Tribes and Native-owned businesses in Southern Arizona, Southern California, Central California and Northern California interested in participating in the project and sharing their stories should contact Gail Chehak, Tribal Relations and Outreach Manager at gchehak@aianta.org.

About the Anza Trail                    
As a unit of the National Park Service, the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail connects history, culture and outdoor recreation along a 1,200-mile corridor from Nogales, Arizona, to the San Francisco Bay Area. The National Trails System—including the Anza Trail was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1968 and celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2018.

 

About AIANTA
For nearly two decades, the American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association (AIANTA) has served as the national center for providing tourism and recreational travel technical assistance, training and capacity building to American Indian nations. AIANTA is a 501(c)(3) national nonprofit association of Native American tribes and tribal businesses and was incorporated in 2002 to advance Indian Country tourism. AIANTA’s mission is to define, introduce, grow and sustain American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian tourism that honors traditions and values.

 

AIANTA/Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail Project Team 

Gail Chehak (Klamath Tribes); Project Lead
AIANTA Tribal Relations & Outreach Manager
gchehak@aianta.org

Amy Meak (Dine)
AIANTA Researcher
ameak@aianta.org

Margaret Pearce (Citizen Potawatomi)
Cartographer
margaret@studio1to1.net

Steve Larese
AIANTA Travel Writer
stevelarese@gmail.com

Monica Poling
AIANTA Marketing & PR Manager
mpoling@aianta.org

Naomi Torres, Superintendent
Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail
naomi_torres@nps.gov

More information can be requested by calling 505-724-3592